Solar farms taking root in North Carolina

July 21, 2014 by  
Filed under Solar Energy Tips

Solar farms taking root in North Carolina

Solar farms taking root in North Carolina

Workers look over solar panels while constructing a new Strata Solar facility in Erwin.

Solar farms take root in North Carolina

Solar farms take root in North Carolina

Joel Olsen, president of 02 Energies, stands at a solar farm in Fairmont.

Solar farms taking root in North Carolina

Solar farms taking root in North Carolina



Posted: Friday, July 18, 2014 5:23 pm
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Updated: 9:41 am, Sat Jul 19, 2014.

Solar farms taking root in North Carolina

By Steve DeVane Staff writer

FAIRMONT — Helen Livingston’s family has owned a 300-acre farm near Maxton for generations. Now 45 acres of the land is covered with more than 26,000 dark solar panels, making it part of a growing movement to harvest electricity from the sun.

Solar farms like Livingston’s are cropping up all over North Carolina, shining rays of hope on economically depressed areas by bringing jobs, a constant stream of revenue and the potential to attract eco-friendly industry and economic investment.

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on

Friday, July 18, 2014 5:23 pm.

Updated: 9:41 am.

Drought hinders California’s clean energy goals

July 21, 2014 by  
Filed under Solar Energy Tips

National News

Drought hinders California’s clean energy goals
July 20, 2014 20:41 GMT

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California’s ongoing drought could complicate the state’s effort to combat global warming.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports Sunday (http://bit.ly/1qTT5Ej ) that a drought stretching on for years could slash the amount of clean energy collected from the state’s dams and send emissions spewing from other sources.

State officials are pushing utility companies by 2020 to obtain 33 percent of their electricity from renewable sources that also include wind and solar power.

California is in its third dry year, and officials say many power-generating reservoirs are low. That forces power companies to buy energy from conventional plants that burn natural gas.

The newspaper reports that the drought causes farmers to pump more ground water to irrigate their crops, putting higher demands on the power grid or spewing pollution from diesel-powered generators.

Information from: San Francisco Chronicle, http://www.sfgate.com