Congress cautioned against reviving wind energy tax credit

June 17, 2014 by  
Filed under Green Energy News

Grassroots organizations continue to urge Congress not to bring back the wind energy tax credit.

Americans for Prosperity sent a letter to Congress this month, expressing AFP’s “strong opposition to renewing expired wind tax incentives.” More than 100 organizations, including Heritage Action for America, Competitive Enterprise Institute and 60 Plus Association, co-signed the letter. AFP’s Federal Issues Campaign Manager Christine Harbin Hanson will be briefing members of Congress this Thursday.

Hanson

“The main handout for wind energy, the production tax credit, expired at the end of 2013,” she explains. “However, there is a movement in Congress right now to extend it as part of broad tax extender legislation. So Americans for Prosperity and over 100 of our coalition partners are calling on Congress to oppose resurrecting this misguided handout for the wind energy industry.”

Senator Chuck Grassley [R-Iowa] is one lawmaker that supports wind energy. Iowa has been a major player in wind energy, which now generates a sizeable portion of Iowa’s electricity supply. Grassley tells OneNewsNow that means a result of jobs and investment. However, Hanson believes such an approach ignores the problem of fiscal spending.

“One of the more curious things about support for wind energy tax incentives is that it doesn’t fall cleanly across partisan lines, and that’s why we see some Republican lawmakers like Senator Grassley calling to extend them,” she tells OneNewsNow. “It’s really concerning because this means that lawmakers are overlooking the principles of fiscal restraint and reining in Washington.”

Hanson adds that we should have free market solutions for our energy policy, solutions that can stand or fall on their own merits, not just because the government tilts the playing field towards one and not the other.

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