Egypt Investing Big In Solar Energy, Announces $1 Billion Investment

May 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Green Energy News

Clean Power
Egyptian flag

Published on May 4th, 2014
by James Ayre

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The new Egyptian government apparently sees solar energy as being a key part of the country’s future, based on recent comments made by its Local and Administrative Development Minister Adel Labib.

At the recent inauguration of a conference organized by Alexandria’s Chamber of Commerce, Labib announced that the Egyptian government will be investing around/up to $1 billion into a giant solar energy project(s?) in the coming years.

Egyptian flag

Unfortunately there aren’t many more details out there right now about this “$1 billion project(s?)” — given that the limited information available was provided by Egypt’s State Information Service, it’s something of an open question when further information will become available.

Among Labib’s other comments was the remark that the country possesses substantial mineral resources that have, until now, remained undeveloped — and that the country has a great need for the establishment of greater job opportunities for the country’s youth. It’s currently unknown to what degree these other comments will pertain to solar energy development.

As it stands currently, Egypt is aiming to receive roughly 20% of its energy from renewable sources by the year 2020. A goal which has been helped in recent years by the development of large projects, such as the previously reported on 750 MW worth of wind energy currently under development.

In somewhat related news, researchers from Ain Shams University in Egypt recently released their findings on an entirely different way of harnessing the sun’s energy for human benefit — redirecting sunlight from rooftops to the dark urban alleyways below via the use of specialized corrugated, translucent panels.

Keep up with all the hottest solar power news here on CleanTechnica, or even subscribe to our free solar power newsletter.

Image Credit: Egyptian Flag via Flickr CC

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About the Author

James Ayre’s background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.


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  • According to PVinsights, http://www.pvinsights.com , Egypt grid-tie solar energy cost can easily reach below USD 0.05/KWh, which is very cost competitive to conventional utility.

    • Egypt has subsidised electricity, but the government recently announced it will push through price increases for better off citizens. Subsidied grid electricity reduces the attractiveness of point of use solar, but this just means the government has an incentive to encourage it and of course it can benefit from utility scale solar, particularly since Egypt still burns some oil to produce electricity, and the country would be far better off using solar power and exporting that oil instead.

    • And the major electicity demand peaks due to AC in the summer

  • No doubt this is a situation with a lot of uncertainty, but for the
    speculative investor the setting could be one with a huge reward

  • Among Labib’s other comments was the remark that the country possesses substantial mineral resources that have, until now, remained undeveloped — and that the country has a great need for the establishment of greater job opportunities for the country’s youth. http://qr.net/x1m8

    • William, a little less with the deja vu, please.

      • And just to be clear, in this context “a little less” means “a lot less” like all of it.

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