Eternal night

July 6, 2013 by  
Filed under Wind Energy Tips

‘; var fr = document.getElementById(adID); setHash(fr, hash); fr.body = body; var doc = getFrameDocument(fr); doc.open(); doc.write(body); setTimeout(function() {closeDoc(getFrameDocument(document.getElementById(adID)))}, 2000); } function renderJIFAdWithInterim(holderID, adID, srcUrl, width, height, hash, bodyAttributes) { setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.dcdAdsR.push(adID); document.write(”); } function renderIJAd(holderID, adID, srcUrl, hash) { document.dcdAdsAA.push(holderID); setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.write(” + ‘ript’); } function renderJAd(holderID, adID, srcUrl, hash) { document.dcdAdsAA.push(holderID); setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.dcdAdsH.push(holderID); document.dcdAdsI.push(adID); document.dcdAdsU.push(srcUrl); } function er_showAd() { var regex = new RegExp(“externalReferrer=(.*?)(; |$)”, “gi”); var value = regex.exec(document.cookie); if (value value.length == 3) { var externalReferrer = value[1]; return (!FD.isInternalReferrer() || ((externalReferrer) (externalReferrer 0))); } return false; } function isHome() { var loc = “” + window.location; loc = loc.replace(“//”, “”); var tokens = loc.split(“/”); if (tokens.length == 1) { return true; } else if (tokens.length == 2) { if (tokens[1].trim().length == 0) { return true; } } return false; } function checkAds(checkStrings) { var cs = checkStrings.split(“,”); for (var i=0;i 0 cAd.innerHTML.indexOf(c)0) { document.dcdAdsAI.push(cAd.hash); cAd.style.display =’none’; } } } if (!ie) { for (var i=0;i 0 doc.body.innerHTML.indexOf(c)0) { document.dcdAdsAI.push(fr.hash); fr.style.display =’none’; } } } } } if (document.dcdAdsAI.length 0 || document.dcdAdsAG.length 0) { var pingServerParams = “i=”; var sep = “”; for (var i=0;i 0) { var pingServerUrl = “/action/pingServerAction?” + document.pingServerAdParams; var xmlHttp = null; try { xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest(); } catch(e) { try { xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject(“Microsoft.XMLHttp”); } catch(e) { xmlHttp = null; } } if (xmlHttp != null) { xmlHttp.open( “GET”, pingServerUrl, true); xmlHttp.send( null ); } } } function initAds(log) { for (var i=0;i 0) { doc.removeChild(doc.childNodes[0]); } doc.open(); var newBody = fr.body; if (getCurrentOrd(newBody) != “” ) { newBody = newBody.replace(“;ord=”+getCurrentOrd(newBody), “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } else { newBody = newBody.replace(“;ord=”, “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } doc.write(newBody); document.dcdsAdsToClose.push(fr.id); } } else { var newSrc = fr.src; if (getCurrentOrd(newSrc) != “” ) { newSrc = newSrc.replace(“;ord=”+getCurrentOrd(newSrc), “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } else { newSrc = newSrc.replace(“;ord=”, “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } fr.src = newSrc; } } } if (document.dcdsAdsToClose.length 0) { setTimeout(function() {closeOpenDocuments(document.dcdsAdsToClose)}, 500); } } }; var ie = isIE(); if(ie typeof String.prototype.trim !== ‘function’) { String.prototype.trim = function() { return this.replace(/^s+|s+$/g, ”); }; } document.dcdAdsH = new Array(); document.dcdAdsI = new Array(); document.dcdAdsU = new Array(); document.dcdAdsR = new Array(); document.dcdAdsEH = new Array(); document.dcdAdsE = new Array(); document.dcdAdsEC = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAA = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAI = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAG = new Array(); document.dcdAdsToClose = new Array(); document.igCount = 0; document.tCount = 0; var dcOrd = Math.floor(100000000*Math.random()); document.dcAdsCParams = “”; var savValue = getAdCookie(“sav”); if (savValue != null savValue.length 2) { document.dcAdsCParams = savValue + “;”; }

LifeStyle


Night show  the northern lights, seen here in Iceland, are an elusive but spectacular display.

Night show … the northern lights, seen here in Iceland, are an elusive but spectacular display. Photo: Getty Images

It was in the late ’80s that I saw the northern lights for the first time. I was 18 and had moved to an island in the far north of Norway to take a job as a teacher in a little school in one of the small villages up there. The village was located in the shadow of a steep, barren mountain chain, looking out on the Atlantic Ocean. Fewer than 300 people lived there, and almost all of them were involved in fishing, either as fishermen on small vessels, or as workers in the fish warehouse.

It was an exposed place. One night a roof was ripped off and a camping trailer was overturned by high winds; some of the buildings had been fastened to guy wires.

Everything came from the sea: the wind, the clouds, the rain, the waves and the fish, which were at the centre of village life. Few of the houses had gardens; there was no buffer between civilisation and nature. When you opened the door, it felt as if you were stepping out into nature, and that left its mark on the people who lived there.

Sense of anticipation  twilight on the village of Reine in the Lofoten Islands, Norway.

Sense of anticipation … twilight on the village of Reine in the Lofoten Islands, Norway. Photo: Getty Images

The social life was different from what I was used to; it was more raw and much more direct, but also warmer and more inclusive. Maybe because that’s all there was – a few clusters of buildings near the sea – and those who lived there were dependent on one another.

A decade later, I wrote a novel set in that place, and what stayed with me – aside from the odd social reality, in which, after only a few days, I became mercilessly entangled – what really settled as a memory in my body was the light.

Oh, that Arctic light, how concisely it delineates the world, with what unprecedented clarity: the sharp, rugged mountains against the clear blue sky, the green of the slopes, the small boats chugging in or out of the harbour. And on board the vessels, the huge codfish from the depths, with their greyish-white skin and yellow eyes staring vacantly, or on the drying racks, where they hung by the thousands, slowly shrivelling for later shipment to the southern lands. Everything was as sharp as a knife.

Silent night  the aurora borealis over Pingvellir church, Iceland.

Silent night … the aurora borealis over Pingvellir church, Iceland. Photo: Getty Images

And then came the northern autumn, and with it the dark that closed around the day, which got shorter and shorter. Soon it lasted only a few hours, as if caught between two walls of darkness moving closer and closer until everything was night. Except for a faint pulse of bluish light in the middle of the day, it was dark all the time.

Living and working in that kind of darkness, a sort of eternal night, does something to a person’s relationship to reality; it becomes dreamlike, shadowlike, as if the world has come to an end. That’s when the northern lights appear, that’s when these great veils of light are drawn across the sky, and even if you know what the phenomenon is and why it occurs, the sight is still mysterious, immensely foreign.

The first time I saw it, I was sitting in a car with a friend. We stopped and got out and stood there, staring, in the middle of the wilderness, spellbound like animals caught in a spotlight.

Show's not over  the northern lights are often followed by a beautiful dawn.

Show’s not over … the northern lights can be followed by a beautiful dawn. Photo: Getty Images

The northern lights compel your eyes upward. They’re impossible to ignore. A simple phenomenon, rays striking the atmosphere, no more mysterious than the beam from a flashlight. Yet the lights convey a sense of being at the very edge of the world and looking out at the endless, empty universe through which we are all careening.

For those who lived on these islands, the light was part of their everyday life. The sun was another matter. After months of total darkness, the moment when the sun appeared for the first time was almost reverential, and during the spring and summer, when all darkness vanished and the sun shone in the sky both night and day, at times as red as blood, the mood in that tiny community was elated; people went out at night, stayed awake and drank.

It was amazing, but it also felt dangerous, because the division between night and day is a border, perhaps the most fundamental one we have, and up there it was abolished, first in an eternal night, then in an eternal day.

 

Karl Ove Knausgård is the author of the six-volume autobiography My Struggle.

Translated from the Norwegian by Tiina Nunnally.

 


 

A GUIDE TO THE GLOW

Auroras (which can happen at both the north and south poles) begin with the solar wind, a constant stream made up mostly of electrons and protons that flow from the sun. When this wind runs into the earth’s magnetic field, most of the particles just bounce off, but some penetrate as the magnetic field becomes distorted. Like a rubber band being stretched, the magnetic field eventually snaps back.

When it does, energy is released in the form of electrically charged particles that shoot into the earth’s atmosphere. There, the particles run into atoms of gas, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and the energy from those collisions is then released in the form of photons, which appears to us as light. Roughly every 11 years, the activity on the sun peaks and the northern lights are at their most brilliant, as they are this year. – Maggie Koerth-Baker

 


 

TRIP TIPS

Where to go
The city of Tromsø in northern Norway is one of the best places to view the lights. See visittromso.no for tours and accommodation.

Getting there
Norwegian Air (norwegian.no) has flights from Oslo to Tromsø.

When to go
The northern lights can be seen between September and March.

What to wear
As Norwegians say, there’s no bad weather, just bad clothes. Splurge on a high-quality down jacket; expensive but fashionable and very warm. Temperatures in Norway’s north can plunge to minus 25°C in winter, so invest in quality thermals.

What to drink
Order a sort kaffe – black coffee – from one of Oslo’s top small-batch roasters such as Tim Wendelboe. Or knock back a shot of Norwegian firewater Linie Aquavit.

Essential words
Thank you. Takk.

How much does this cost? Hvor mye koster dette?

Will you marry me? Vil du gifte deg med meg?

I don’t understand. Jeg forstår ikke.

Life-affirming experience
See Norwegian anthropologist Thor Heyerdahl’s balsa raft in the Kon-Tiki Museum. In 1947, Heyerdahl set out to show South Americans could have settled Polynesia.

Trivial pursuit
Booze bottles are elevated into objet d’art at Oslo’s Mini Bottle Gallery.

Best souvenir
Norwegian company Viking puts a retro spin on practical wellies.

Essential reading
The noir crime thrillers of Jo Nesbø.

More information
visitnorway.com
northernnorway.com


Advertisement

Photo Galleries

A woman’s right to Choos

Jenna Clarke - My Jennaration

Our latest feminist icon, US Senator Wendy Davis, is now … 

Is flirting outside your …

Katherine Feeney - CityKat

Flirting is something we do when we want to have sex with … 

Partnered up and longing for …

Katherine Feeney - CityKat

What happens when you find yourself wishing you were single … 

The IQ mineral

Paula Goodyer - Chew on This

Baby brains need iodine – but is the message to take extra … 

Putting the me before the we

Katherine Feeney - CityKat

If you’re looking for The One, you need to take care of No … 

Midlife eating disorders – a …

Paula Goodyer - Chew on This

You don’t have to be young and female to have an eating … 

Sex as stress relief can …

Katherine Feeney - CityKat

Should you be upset if your partner shags you for stress … 

Midlife eating disorders – a …

Paula Goodyer - Chew on This

You don’t have to be young and female to have an eating … 

Many hearts not fond of …

Katherine Feeney - CityKat

Does absence really make the heart grow fonder? 

What if women got erections?

Katherine Feeney - CityKat

If a woman were more aware of her own arousal, would she be … 

Featured advertisers


iPhone 5 16GB Deal from $67/Mth

iPhone 5 16GB Deal from $67/Mth

Starting from $67/Mth with upgrade deals available
Min. Total Cost $1,608
over 24 months

Optus

 

Compare Mobile Phones


First Month Free on Yatango Mobile

First Month Free on Yatango Mobile

BYO phone and design your own SIM Only plan, powered by Optus 4G. No contract!

Yatango Mobile

 

Compare Mobile Phones


GALAXY S4 from $67/Mth on Optus

GALAXY S4 from $67/Mth on Optus

NEW Samsung GALAXY S4 starting at $67/Month
Min. Total Cost $1,608
over 24 months

Optus

 

Compare Now


Sony Xperia Z from $60/Mth

Sony Xperia Z from $60/Mth

Compare plans starting at $60/Month with Optus
Min. Total Cost $1,440
over 24 months

Optus

 

Compare Mobile Phones


Business Grade Broadband Deal

Business Grade Broadband Deal

Symmetrical download upload speeds on SHDSL… dedicated business broadband

IF Telecom

 

Compare Mobile Phones


Business Grade Broadband Deal

Business Grade Broadband Deal

Symmetrical download upload speeds on SHDSL… dedicated business broadband

IF Telecom

 

Compare Mobile Phones


Compare Naked Broadband Plans

Compare Naked Broadband Plans

Compare hundreds of ADSL 2, Naked DSL and NBN prices from all major providers here
 

Compare Now


Unmetered ABC iView Broadband

Unmetered ABC iView Broadband

Compare broadband plans which offer un-metered ABC iView access via a browser
 

Compare Now

Popular phones | Compare All

Mobile phone deals in the market…

DodoDodo32 DealsYatango MobileYatango Mobil…6 DealsVayaVaya5 DealsVirgin MobileVirgin Mobile5 DealsOptusOptus4 Deals

Deals powered by WhistleOut

WhistleOut

Advertisement

Horoscopes

Libra horoscope

You have a lot of love to give, today more than ever. You understand where people are coming from, which helps you treat them with empathy.

…find out more here

Advertisement

Entertainment


gig-image-rainbow

Find the latest gigs in Sydney

Jobs


Looking to work underground - Become a mining engineer

We’re mining for talent – Become a mining engineer

Managed Funds


InvestSMART best performing investments 2011

4.75% On Savings Accounts!

Dating


Couple in a piggyback pose

Australia’s Favourite Dating Site

TheVine


tatts

52 Reasons to Think Before You Ink


Compare and Save

Skip to:

Check out today’s best deals

Fixed Rates Fall

Rates hit record low of 4.54% . Compare and save.

0% Balance Transfer

Transfer credit card balances at 0% p.a. for 9 months

Top Variable Rate

Australia’s lowest variable rate. New purchase only.

Compare Mobile Deals

New phone plans hit the market

Hot Android Deals

Compare prices and deals on Android phones



Feedback Form







Comments are closed.