Exploring wind energy

June 14, 2014 by  
Filed under Green Energy News

In the long run, an alternative energy source in the form of wind would have benefits for our pollution-filled environment as it would reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. PHOTO: FILE

With Pakistan’s growing demand for energy, there is a significant need to direct our attention to alternative energy sources. In the current decade (2010), Pakistan’s net electricity consumption increased to approximately 74 billion kilowatthours (KWh) from 47 billion KWh in 2000. While importing hybrid cars and using more advanced, environmentally-friendly technology are options, they are not accessible nor feasible for the majority in Pakistan due to their associated costs. With an abundance of natural resources in the country, however, availing wind energy is a viable option, as discussed at a recent meeting between the Pakistani government, the government of Denmark and a leading Danish manufacturer of wind turbines. Renewable energy is an underdeveloped sector in Pakistan that is yet to be exploited. In the long run, an alternative energy source in the form of wind would have benefits for our pollution-filled environment as it would reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions.

There is mass potential for the use of wind turbines to generate electricity. According to the Pakistan Meteorological Department, the payback period for a wind farm is seven to eight years. While this requires some patience on the investors’ part, there are many hopeful possibilities. For one, we can perhaps, put an end to the sudden power outages at hospitals across the country that often lead to the deaths of patients on ventilators.

With a topsy-turvy economy, Pakistan requires a stable energy programme that has long-term benefits and lower operational costs. A three per cent decrease in GDP per annum due to controlled electricity shutdowns amounts to a massive portion in an already struggling economy. With power outages, the economy is directly impacted as factories are shut down for hours on end. Due to the annual rising demand for energy in Pakistan and the damage caused by power outages to our economy, there is a dire need to fill in the gap in the system.

Published in The Express Tribune, June 15th, 2014.

Like Opinion Editorial on Facebook, follow @ETOpEd on Twitter to receive all updates on all our daily pieces.

Comments are closed.