Got galoshes? You may need them still

June 8, 2013 by  
Filed under Wind Energy Tips

GREENSBORO – Tired of the rain? There’s more to come.


There’s a 70 percent chance of thunderstorms in Greensboro on Saturday, meteorologists with the National Weather Service said.

Scattered showers and thunderstorms remain possible through Tuesday.

Forecasters predicted up to 2 inches of rain Thursday and Friday for Greensboro, but just less than an inch fell.

By comparison, Tropical Storm Andrea dropped 5.9 inches in Mount Airy on Friday alone and 1.19 inches at Smith Reynolds Airport in Winston-Salem.

Rain caused some flooding on westbound lanes of Interstate 40 at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Greensboro.

Waterlogged ground led to some trees blowing over, causing power outages for more than 1,400 Duke Energy customers at one point in Guilford County. By late Friday, Duke reported only a handful of outages.

Expect more rain through early next week.

However, drier air is forecast to move into the area about Wednesday.


GREENSBORO — Tropical Storm Andrea passed out of North Carolina late this afternoon and left limited damage in its wake.

The storm produced torrential rains for some areas of the state. Trees, susceptible to being blown over with the saturated ground, fell and knocked out electricity for scattered citizens, meteorologists said.

Power has been restored to most of the Duke Energy customers in the Piedmont Triad who lost electricity during storms today.

At one point, more than 1,400 customers in Guilford County had lost electricity, according to the power company’s website. As of 7:15 p.m., that number was reduced to 4.

The number of customers in Alamance County that had lost electricity was at 21, in Randolph County was 30 and in Rockingham County was 3.


GREENSBORO — Crews have restored electricity to many Duke Energy customers in the Piedmont Triad.

Hundreds still remain without power. The power company’s website showed at 6:10 p.m. that 367 Guilford County customers still had no electricity. That number was down from nearly 1,400 two hours earlier.

In Alamance County, 21 customers still had no electricity, down from 35.

Randolph County customers without electricity had jumped to 87.

Three Rockingham County customers had no electricity.


GREENSBORO — About 1,500 Duke Energy customers in the Piedmont Triad have no electricity.

The power company’s website showed that at 4:15 p.m., 1,398 customers in Guilford County had power outages. At the same time, there were 82 customers in Alamance County and 35 in Randolph County without electricity.

The power company did not have estimates for when power would be restored.


GREENSBORO — The rain will continue today, and some areas are already are seeing flooding.

Greensboro police said Interstate 40 West at exit 222, Martin Luther King Dr., had flooding around 3:45 a.m. today. By 9 a.m. the water had receeded and traffic was moving at normal speeds on the interstate.

The National Weather Service said the Triad will likely receive between one and three-and-a-half inches of rain today from Tropical Storm Andrea. However, some areas could see up to five inches. The flash flood warning is issued through 6 p.m.

Isolated severe thunderstorms are possible Saturday afternoon and Saturday evening, the National Weather Service reported. There’s also a small chance for damaging winds and hail.


 

GREENSBORO – Torrential downpours associated with Tropical Storm Andrea were expected overnight Thursday and through Friday in the Piedmont Triad, according to the National Weather Service in Raleigh.

The agency expected 2 to 3-1/2 inches of rain from the fast-moving storm. Some areas could receive 2 inches of rain in less than two hours, leading to flash flooding, meteorologists said.

A flash flood watch remains in effect until Friday afternoon.

Flash flooding was expected along creeks and in poor drainage areas.

Urban flooding could occur at highway construction sites and at railway and highway underpasses. The National Weather Service reminds travelers to never drive through high water.

As of 8 p.m. Thursday, Andrea was about 45 miles west of Gainesville, Fla., moving northeast at 15 mph. Its maximum sustained wind speed was 50 mph.

The storm triggered tropical storm warnings as far north as Chesapeake Bay. The warnings included the North Carolina coast.

John Elardo, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Newport, said the storm would push major waves to the north and northeast, away from the Outer Banks, where a series of storms in the fall and winter wore away dunes and washed out portions of N.C. 12, the only road connecting the barrier island to the mainland of North Carolina.

Andrea could bring up to a foot of flooding on the sound side of the Outer Banks, Elardo said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Got galoshes? You may need them still

June 8, 2013 by  
Filed under Wind Energy Tips

GREENSBORO – Tired of the rain? There’s more to come.


There’s a 70 percent chance of thunderstorms in Greensboro on Saturday, meteorologists with the National Weather Service said.

Scattered showers and thunderstorms remain possible through Tuesday.

Forecasters predicted up to 2 inches of rain Thursday and Friday for Greensboro, but just less than an inch fell.

By comparison, Tropical Storm Andrea dropped 5.9 inches in Mount Airy on Friday alone and 1.19 inches at Smith Reynolds Airport in Winston-Salem.

Rain caused some flooding on westbound lanes of Interstate 40 at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Greensboro.

Waterlogged ground led to some trees blowing over, causing power outages for more than 1,400 Duke Energy customers at one point in Guilford County. By late Friday, Duke reported only a handful of outages.

Expect more rain through early next week.

However, drier air is forecast to move into the area about Wednesday.


GREENSBORO — Tropical Storm Andrea passed out of North Carolina late this afternoon and left limited damage in its wake.

The storm produced torrential rains for some areas of the state. Trees, susceptible to being blown over with the saturated ground, fell and knocked out electricity for scattered citizens, meteorologists said.

Power has been restored to most of the Duke Energy customers in the Piedmont Triad who lost electricity during storms today.

At one point, more than 1,400 customers in Guilford County had lost electricity, according to the power company’s website. As of 7:15 p.m., that number was reduced to 4.

The number of customers in Alamance County that had lost electricity was at 21, in Randolph County was 30 and in Rockingham County was 3.


GREENSBORO — Crews have restored electricity to many Duke Energy customers in the Piedmont Triad.

Hundreds still remain without power. The power company’s website showed at 6:10 p.m. that 367 Guilford County customers still had no electricity. That number was down from nearly 1,400 two hours earlier.

In Alamance County, 21 customers still had no electricity, down from 35.

Randolph County customers without electricity had jumped to 87.

Three Rockingham County customers had no electricity.


GREENSBORO — About 1,500 Duke Energy customers in the Piedmont Triad have no electricity.

The power company’s website showed that at 4:15 p.m., 1,398 customers in Guilford County had power outages. At the same time, there were 82 customers in Alamance County and 35 in Randolph County without electricity.

The power company did not have estimates for when power would be restored.


GREENSBORO — The rain will continue today, and some areas are already are seeing flooding.

Greensboro police said Interstate 40 West at exit 222, Martin Luther King Dr., had flooding around 3:45 a.m. today. By 9 a.m. the water had receeded and traffic was moving at normal speeds on the interstate.

The National Weather Service said the Triad will likely receive between one and three-and-a-half inches of rain today from Tropical Storm Andrea. However, some areas could see up to five inches. The flash flood warning is issued through 6 p.m.

Isolated severe thunderstorms are possible Saturday afternoon and Saturday evening, the National Weather Service reported. There’s also a small chance for damaging winds and hail.


 

GREENSBORO – Torrential downpours associated with Tropical Storm Andrea were expected overnight Thursday and through Friday in the Piedmont Triad, according to the National Weather Service in Raleigh.

The agency expected 2 to 3-1/2 inches of rain from the fast-moving storm. Some areas could receive 2 inches of rain in less than two hours, leading to flash flooding, meteorologists said.

A flash flood watch remains in effect until Friday afternoon.

Flash flooding was expected along creeks and in poor drainage areas.

Urban flooding could occur at highway construction sites and at railway and highway underpasses. The National Weather Service reminds travelers to never drive through high water.

As of 8 p.m. Thursday, Andrea was about 45 miles west of Gainesville, Fla., moving northeast at 15 mph. Its maximum sustained wind speed was 50 mph.

The storm triggered tropical storm warnings as far north as Chesapeake Bay. The warnings included the North Carolina coast.

John Elardo, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Newport, said the storm would push major waves to the north and northeast, away from the Outer Banks, where a series of storms in the fall and winter wore away dunes and washed out portions of N.C. 12, the only road connecting the barrier island to the mainland of North Carolina.

Andrea could bring up to a foot of flooding on the sound side of the Outer Banks, Elardo said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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