How To Fix Health Problems With Food – Huffington Post

May 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Solar Energy Tips

By Sarah Richards

Can’t sleep? Got the PMS blues? Before you open your medicine cabinet, step into your kitchen. “Real, whole, fresh food is the most powerful drug on the planet,” says Mark Hyman, M.D., author of The Blood Sugar Solution. “It regulates every biological function of your body.” In fact, recent research suggests not only what to eat but when to eat it for maximum benefit. Check out the latest smart food fixes.

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Problem: I’m Bloated
Food Fix 1: Dig In To Juicy Fruits And Vegetables
When you’re feeling puffy, you may not want to chow down on watery produce, but consuming foods like melon, cucumber and celery is an excellent way to flush out your system, says Elizabeth Somer, RD, author of Food Mood. “We need sodium to survive,” she explains, “but because we often eat too much of it, our bodies retain water to dilute the blood down to a sodium concentration it can handle. Eating produce with high water content helps the dilution process, so your body can excrete excess sodium and water.”

Food Fix 2: Load Up On Enzymes
Bloating can also be a sign that your intestines are out of whack. “If you’re irregular or experience gas right after eating, papaya can help,” explains Dharma Singh Khalsa, M.D., author of Food As Medicine. “Eating 1 cup several times a week helps rejuvenate the gastrointestinal system, thanks to papaya’s digestive enzyme papain, which breaks down protein.” The fiber also helps push food through your intestines, improving regularity. Try a smoothie with papaya, pineapple (it also contains digestive enzymes), protein powder, ice and almond milk.

Problem: I’m On An Emotional Roller Coaster
Food Fix 1: Say Yes To Breakfast
“People who eat within an hour or two of waking up have a more even mood throughout the rest of the day and perform better at work,” Somer says. British researchers found that study participants who skipped their morning meal did worse on memory tests and were more tired by midday than those who had eaten. The optimal breakfast includes a whole grain to supply glucose for your brain to run on, protein to satisfy hunger and keep your blood sugar levels steady and one or two antioxidant-rich fruits or vegetables. Somer’s suggestion: a 100 percent whole-grain cereal that contains at least 4 grams of fiber and no more than 5 grams of sugar, eaten with fruit and low-fat milk.

Food Fix 2: Stock Up On Selenium
A lesser-known trace mineral, selenium — found in Brazil nuts, tuna, eggs and turkey — helps keep you on an even keel. Women whose diets are deficient in the mineral are more prone to feeling depressed. Why? Selenium is crucial for the production of thyroid hormones, which govern metabolism and mood. You don’t need much, though: The recommended daily allowance for selenium is 55 micrograms, and you can get that amount by eating one 3-ounce can of tuna.

Problem: My Skin Is Acting Up
The Food Fix: Eat Your Onions
Battling breakouts? The antioxidants in onions and other sulfur-rich veggies tamp down the inflammation that leads to acne, says Valori Treloar, M.D., a dermatologist in Newton, Mass., and co-author of The Clear Skin Diet. The sulfur in onions, leeks and scallions helps produce a detoxifying molecule called glutathione, which a 2011 study found to be lower in the skin of people who were prone to breakouts.

This antioxidant is most potent when eaten in raw or lightly cooked foods. Try adding chopped scallions to your salad or stirring diced onions into your salsa or stir-fry. Taking folate and vitamin B6 and B12 supplements may also boost glutathione levels.

Problem: I Get Crazy-Bad Jet Lag
The Food Fix: Don’t Snack On The Plane
It’s no fun spending the first days of your vacation trying to acclimate. One surprising secret to avoiding the headaches, irritability and upset stomach of jet lag is to fast for several hours before arriving at your destination. That’s because when you eat influences your circadian rhythms, in much the same way that exposure to light and dark does.

Let’s say you’re headed to France. On the plane, steer clear of most food (but drink plenty of water), set your watch to Paris time and eat a high-protein breakfast at 7 a.m., no matter where you are on your trip. “The fast depletes your body’s energy stores, so when you eat protein the next morning, you get an extra kick and help your body produce waking-up chemicals,” explains Dave Baurac, spokesperson for the Argonne National Laboratory, a research institute based in Illinois.

Problem: I’m Tossing And Turning
Food Fix 1: Have A Late-Night Morsel
We’ve all been told to avoid eating too close to bedtime, but applying this rule too strictly could actually contribute to sleep woes. As anyone who has tried a fast knows, hunger can make you feel edgy, and animal studies confirm this. “You need to be relaxed to fall asleep, and having a grumbling stomach is a distraction,” explains Kelly Glazer Baron, Ph.D., an instructor of neurology at Northwestern University and spokesperson for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. “It makes it hard to get to sleep and wakes you up at night.”

The trick is to tame the munchies 30 minutes to an hour before bed with a small snack that includes complex carbohydrates. “Since you metabolize sugars more slowly at night, a complex carb like whole wheat is a better choice,” Baron says. “It keeps your blood sugar levels even.” Try cheese and whole-wheat crackers or almonds and a banana.

Food Fix 2: Add Cherries
You can boost your snack’s snooze power by washing it down with a glass of tart cherry juice. A recent study of folks with chronic insomnia found that those who downed 8 ounces of juice made from tart Montmorency cherries (available in most grocery stores) one to two hours before bedtime stayed asleep longer than those who drank a placebo juice.

These sour powerhouses — which you can eat fresh, dried or juiced — possess anti-inflammatory properties that may stimulate the production of cytokines, a type of immune-system molecule that helps regulate sleep. Tart cherries are also high in melatonin, a hormone that signals the body to go to sleep and stay that way.

Problem: I Have Wicked PMS
The Food Fix: Keep An Eye On Iron
You might be more susceptible to the monthly blahs if you have low levels of iron, according to a new study.

Researchers looked at the diets of 3,000 women over 10 years and found that those who consumed more than 20 milligrams of the mineral daily had about a 40 percent lower risk of PMS than those who ingested less than 10 milligrams.

You can get almost your full daily dose by eating 1 cup of an iron-fortified cereal; other great sources include white beans (4 milligrams per one-half cup) and sautéed fresh spinach (3 milligrams per one-half cup).

Problem: I’m So Sensitive To The Sun
The Food Fix: Pile On Protective Produce
While you still need the usual sun protection (SPF 30 sunscreen as well as a wide-brimmed hat), you may be able to bolster your skin’s own resistance to UV rays with what you eat. The details: Micronutrients called carotenoids in fruits and vegetables protect the skin against sunburn, recent science shows. “Most topical sunscreens work by filtering out the UV component from the solar light that reaches the skin,” explains researcher Wilhelm Stahl, Ph.D., a professor of biochemistry at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany. “But these micronutrients, if you have enough in your system, actually absorb UV light and prevent damage.”

The most potent carotenoids are the beta-carotene found in carrots, endive and spinach, and the lycopene in watermelon and tomatoes. Keep in mind that the effect isn’t instantaneous; you would need to eat a carotenoid-rich diet for at least 10 to 12 weeks in order to get the full benefit, says Stahl. Still, there is a reward for your patience: skin fortified to fend off sun damage and wrinkles.

Fix Your Health Problems With Food” originally appeared on

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  • Broccoli And Broccoli Sprouts

    Cruciferous vegetables, but broccoli in particular, make for anti-cancer powerhouses thanks in part to a compound called sulforaphane that actually helps the body fight the spread of tumors.

    Recent research revealed the underlying reason: sulforaphane may inhibit an enzyme, called an HDAC, that a href=””works to suppress the body’s tumor fighting ability/a, as we’ve previously reported.

    And sprouts are even more potent: three-day old broccoli sprouts have 20 to 50 times the sulforaphanes as mature broccoli, a href=””according to Johns Hopkins research/a.

    For more about the cancer fighting properties of emall cruciferous vegetables, check HuffPost blogger Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s a href=””analysis of cabbage, brussels sprouts, bok choy and more/a.

  • Garlic

    Garlic is considered a cancer-fighting food for several forms of the disease, a href=”″according to the National Cancer Institute/a.

    One French study found that women who regularly ate garlic had a href=”″a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer/a. Garlic’s mild cousin, onions also had a protective effect, according to the study.

  • Pomegranate

    Pomegranates are known for their anti-cancer properties, thanks to a richness in anti-inflammatory antioxidants, polyphenols. But they may offer a specific benefit against breast cancer: research shows that a phytochemical found in abundance in pomegranates, called ellagitannins, interfere in the production of aromatase, an enzyme that, as HuffPost blogger Dr. Nalini Chilkov explained, “a href=””increases hormone production in breast tissue/a.”

    That’s important because breast cancer is hormone-dependent, meaning that it feeds off of hormones like estrogen to grow and spread.

    “Hormone dependent cancers such as breast cancer are commonly treated with aromatase inhibitors, which block this enzyme,” wrote Chilkov.

  • Walnuts

    Although preliminary, research in mice has found that a href=””including walnuts in a healthful diet throughout the entire lifespan/a reduced the risk of developing breast cancer by emhalf/em.

  • Turmeric

    Curcumin, the compound in turmeric, may play a role in blocking the expression of a molecule called RANKL, a href=””which is found in the most deadly and aggressive breast cancer tumor cells/a.

  • Flax Seeds

    Most research regarding flax’s anti-cancer properties has been done in mice or in-vitro cell cultures, but what it shows could be profound: in one study, according to the American Cancer Society, a href=””the lignans found in flax slowed the movement and “stickiness” of breast cancer cells/a, causing it to spread more slowly in a cell culture simulation.

  • Berries

    Berries have several powerful antioxidants, primarily anthocyanins and ellagic acid, which have been shown in cell culture studies to a href=””reduce free radical damage to healthy cells/a, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. In separate research, they were shown to slow the growth and shorten the lifespan of breast cancer (as well as mouth, colon and prostate cancer) cells.

  • Green Tea

    Green tea is rich in the polyphenol EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate), which has been shown to slow the spread of breast cancer cells, a href=””according to

  • Tomatoes

    Tomatoes are rich in the antioxidant lycopene, which is thought to a href=””slow breast cancer cell growth/a.

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