Monday: Osage wind farm on hold for now

September 2, 2013 by  
Filed under Green Energy News

Monday: Osage wind farm on hold for now

By JARREL WADE World Staff Writer on Sep 1, 2013, at 2:08 PM  

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Raymond Lasley with the Osage Nation shows prairie land in the Flint Hills east of Pawhuska where a proposed windfarm may be constructed. The Osage Nation is fighting a windfarm planned for construction in the area. JAMES GIBBARD/Tulsa World

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State

State lawmakers to address lawsuit reform law in special session

Whether all the provisions of a nullified lawsuit reform law will be re- created during an upcoming special session of the Legislature remains to be determined.

Way back when: Today in history

World War II was over. Two nervous Japanese formally and unconditionally surrendered all remnants of their smashed empire by signing a surrender document at a ceremony on the deck of the U.S.S. Missouri in Tokyo Bay. The weather was cool and the sky cloudy at the surrender hour but the sun broke through 20 minutes later as Gen. Douglas MacArthur intoned “these proceedings are closed.” The ceremony, originally scheduled Aug. 26, had been postponed because of a series of typhoons raging between Okinawa and Japan.

PAWHUSKA — The Osage Nation appears to have struck a blow in a fight against a wind farm ready for construction in Osage County.

Arguing that the wind farm could kill eagles that nest nearby — an important bird to the Osage culture as well as American culture — the wind farm construction has been temporarily set back
Wind Capitol Group, a St. Louis-based energy organization, says construction of the 94 turbines will begin by the end of this year. Wind Capitol Group officials previously said they hoped to begin construction this summer.

“The project continues to work closely with local officials on required authorizations and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the voluntary Eagle Take Permit and looks forward to providing clean renewable energy to the American people in the coming year,” according to a statement from Wind Capital Group.

However, the Osage Nation, which has longstanding interests in oil and gas in the area, is now pushing for full archaeological research in the wind farm’s acreage, saying the area is some of the densest in all of Oklahoma for culturally significant tribal sites such as camp sites and burials.

Read more in Monday’s Tulsa World.

State

State lawmakers to address lawsuit reform law in special session

Whether all the provisions of a nullified lawsuit reform law will be re- created during an upcoming special session of the Legislature remains to be determined.

Way back when: Today in history

World War II was over. Two nervous Japanese formally and unconditionally surrendered all remnants of their smashed empire by signing a surrender document at a ceremony on the deck of the U.S.S. Missouri in Tokyo Bay. The weather was cool and the sky cloudy at the surrender hour but the sun broke through 20 minutes later as Gen. Douglas MacArthur intoned “these proceedings are closed.” The ceremony, originally scheduled Aug. 26, had been postponed because of a series of typhoons raging between Okinawa and Japan.

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