Ohio bill could put the freeze on green energy

March 29, 2014 by  
Filed under Green Energy News



Faber, Keith '08

Ohio Senate President Keith Faber says the new bill will create a 20-person study group consisting of 10 legislators and 10 people “from interested and impacted areas, including customers.”











Tom Knox
Reporter- Columbus Business First

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Ohio Sen. Troy Balderson, R-Zanesville, will introduce a bill Friday that will freeze Ohio’s renewable energy and energy efficiency requirements.

That means Ohio utilities would still have to meet a 4.2 percent benchmark to reduce customer energy usage by year’s end. After that, though, the planned jumps would not need to be met until or if a freeze is lifted.

The renewable energy portion has yearly benchmarks that utilities must meet, too. For this year, that number is only 2.5 percent, and 0.12 percent for solar energy. Utilities don’t have to meet interim benchmarks regarding non-renewable advanced energy, which includes fuel cells and “clean coal.”

The bill would create a 20-person study group consisting of 10 legislators and 10 people “from interested and impacted areas, including customers,” Ohio Sen. President Keith Faber, R-Celina told me.

Faber said he expects the bill to move quickly, and a concurrent House bill will also be introduced tomorrow.

The bill will first be heard in the Senate’s Public Utilities Committee, which is chaired by Bill Seitz, R- Cincinnati. Seitz has tried to move his own similar bill related to renewables and energy-efficiency,  as I reported earlier this week

There was some discussion that Balderson’s bill would implement a freeze of 18 months, but Faber said the freeze will last “until the legislature decides to act again.”

Balderson is chair of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

Renewable and energy-efficiency advocates have told me that the uncertainty around all of the pending legislation has halted potential projects. When asked if this will make things even worse for those companies, Faber disagreed.



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